Team wisdom in software development projects and its impact on project performance


Akgun A. E.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, vol.50, pp.228-243, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SSCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 50
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2019.05.019
  • Title of Journal : INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
  • Page Numbers: pp.228-243
  • Keywords: Team wisdom, Knowledge management, Software development, Speed-to-users, Team learning, KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, EPISTEMIC ACTION, STUDENT SAMPLES, SUCCESS FACTORS, WORK PRACTICES, ANTECEDENTS, DIVERSITY, INSIGHTS, JUSTICE, DESIGN

Abstract

While the concept of wisdom, which refers to how people make right use of their knowledge through their practical actions, judgments, and ethical decisions, in general attracts researcher interest in a variety of disciplines, such as philosophy, psychology and management studies, little is known about how wisdom is conceptualized and then operationalized in the software development project team context. Based on the frameworks for philosophical, group and organizational wisdom, this paper identifies software development project team wisdom as a process for how team members best use the stock and flow of their knowledge through collective judgment, virtue-ethics, emotions/feelings, and effective decision-making during their project-related efforts. Adapting the efforts and functional similarities of both group and organizational wisdom practices, this effort determines that wisdom-related mechanisms (e.g., team diversity, networking with other teams and people, and their past experiences), joint epistemic actions (e.g., team reasoning, intuition, and aesthetic capacity), and team virtue and prudence become the different faces of the software development team wisdom process. We then propose how these different faces interrelate and how they also relate to project process effectiveness, such as team learning and speed-to-users, both of which have been rarely addressed empirically in the context of software development project teamwork.