Fear of COVID-19, Mindfulness, Humor, and Hopelessness: A Multiple Mediation Analysis


Saricali M., Satici S. A. , Satici B., Gocet-Tekin E., Griffiths M. D.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTION, vol.20, no.4, pp.2151-2164, 2022 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 20 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s11469-020-00419-5
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTION
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, PAIS International, Psycinfo, Social services abstracts, Sociological abstracts
  • Page Numbers: pp.2151-2164
  • Keywords: COVID-19, Hopelessness, Mindfulness, Humor, Fear of COVID-19, Turkey, STRESSFUL LIFE EVENTS, SUICIDE, PERSONALITY, SCALE, EXPECTANCIES, RESILIENCE, DEPRESSION, OUTBREAK, BENEFITS, MODEL

Abstract

Hopelessness is an important vulnerability factor for depressive symptomology and suicidal ideations. It may also play an important role in the fear of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Therefore, the present study tested the mediating role of mindful awareness and humor (both identified as coping strategies for dealing with stressful situations) in the relationship between fear of COVID-19 and hopelessness. Participants comprised 786 Turkish individuals (562 females and 224 males; aged between 18 and 67 years) from 71 of 81 cities in Turkey. An online convenience sampling method was used to recruit participants. Participants completed surveys including the Fear of COVID-19 Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and Coping Humor Scale. The model was tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) and utilizing bootstrapping. The results of SEM showed that the effect of fear of COVID-19 on hopelessness was partly mediated by mindfulness and humor, and which was supported by bootstrapping. Therefore, higher fear of COVID-19 was associated with lower mindfulness and humor. In turn, lower mindfulness and humor were related with higher hopelessness. Findings are discussed in the context of COVID-19 and the hopelessness literature, and practical implications for counselors are also provided.